Tag Archives: Repetitive Stress

Prevention of RSIs

As I have discussed previously our bodies are designed to move. The topic under scrutiny is not called repetitive motion injuries. Moving properly is not only not going to injure you, but it is also essential to good health. So, the first and best way to avoid repetitive stress injuries is to MOVE IN A WAY THAT AVOIDS REPEATEDLY STRESSING YOUR BODY.

If you are new to doing something ask others what they do to make a task less stressful for the body. Most workplaces can benefit financially by having ergonomics lectures or posters or education for their employees. If you don’t have them, discuss this with your company. There are additional benefits to moving properly. You are less tired, work more efficiently, and you are better able to cope with mental stresses. We are more productive workers and cost less in health care if we prevent injury through proper education.

carpal-tunnel-wrist-braceIf you have been doing something wrong for too long, you develop a bad habit. Breaking that habit can be uncomfortable. Have you ever tried sitting up straight at your computer for a whole day. At the end of the day your muscles are sore. They aren’t used to doing things the right way. Your body has adapted to your poor posture and lost good functionality. As with getting in shape you can’t have the perfect body in one day. Start slow, and be consistent with your attempts to change your bad habits.

The second way to prevent RSIs is to allow your self RECOVERY TIME. There is a physics principle called creep – to slip or gradually shift position or to change shape permanently from prolonged stress. This principle is in effect with our ligaments and tendons. Within 20 min. of staying in the same position our ligaments begin to accept the stretch placed on them as normal. To counter creep we should move periodically. After all we were designed to move. So recovery time, every 20-30 min. get up, do something different. Stretches are a easy to do at this time. It doesn’t have to be long especially if you weren’t doing anything too strenuous. Ninety seconds should be adequate recovery time.

Another part of recovery time is your sleep. Sleep is when your body spends its energy recuperating from previous damage you have done to it. So, to avoid RSIs get plenty of sleep.

Third, your body can’t repair its self with out the building blocks it needs. A GOOD DIET is key to preventing RSIs. Some key foods in not only prevention but also recovery from RSI’s are: Vitamin C, fish and greens such as spinach. I should get my nutritionist friends to write a proper diet for connective tissue health, but if you are eating a variety of food, and not a lot of junk, you should be fine.

The last two things to do are common sense. EXERCISE with the goal to improve in the three areas of: strength, endurance, and flexibility. Last, DON’T OVER DO IT.

IN SUMMARY … To prevent RSIs:

1 Use Proper Motion

2 Get Proper Recovery Time

3 Eat Right

4 Exercise and Stretch

5 Don’t Over Do It

Don’t Let Your Computer Beat You Up

How Not to Do It

How Not to Do It

Everyone uses computers now.  We use them at work, at home, at play, our children at school are using them.  As a result of this relatively new activity I see more and more injuries related to it.  Who would have thought that sitting all day could injure you.  Some common computer related injuries are Carpal tunnel Syndrome and other Repetitive Stress Injuries, facet syndrome in the low back and in the neck, upper cross syndrome, and just general back and neck pain.

You can avoid or reduce these problems with a few simple modifications to your computer use.

  1. Take the time to modify your workstation for you.  Especially if there are multiple users of your computer as often happens at home, make sure that you adjust it for you.  At home make sure to educate your family on these tips also.
    • Position the monitor so that the top of the screen is at or below eye level.  If you can’t adjust the monitor try adjusting your chair a little.  The monitor should also be in line with your keyboard so that you are not having to turn to see the screen while you type.
    • Make sure your chair supports you.  Chairs with lumbar support are good, but they must fit you.  You can use towels or pillows or purchase tailored items to fit your back.  You’re chair should have arm rests that fit you.  They should not push your shoulders up or let them hang down.  The back of your knees should be an inch or two in front of the chair, not touching, and your feet should be able to touch the floor or be supported in some way.
    • Keep your mouse close to your keyboard so that you don’t have to hang your arm out away from your body to use the mouse.
    • Use computer settings and lighting to keep text visible for you, not to small so that you end up leaning into the screen just to be able to read it.
  2. Your wrists should be in a neutral position while typing or using your mouse rather than angled up or down.
  3. Limit the time that you are on the computer or take frequent breaks.  This doesn’t mean that you have to get up and waste time for 15 min.  You can take a break by standing up for a second and touching your toes.  Clench your hands into fists and then stretch them out.  Do some wrist exercises.  Twist in your chair to get full spine range of motion.  These things only take a few seconds, and if you remember to do them 3 times an hour you will avoid the effects of creep on you soft tissues.
  4. Drink plenty of water (not soda, or coffee).  Eat a balanced diet and get regular exercise.Good computer posture

Your chiropractor can help you to prevent and reduce computer related injuries.

Video Games Live

I love music, I play the trumpet, and sing. I love acting and the arts. Something that really lifts my spirits is live music. The symphony, the theater, concerts… As a chiropractor one of my niche group of patients is musicians. I love to treat them, and they all need me. I’ve already talked about repetitive stress injuries. Most musicians know about repetitive stress, and fear it.

I also love computer games. World of Warcraft is one of my favorite games ever. (Lvl 70 Warlock for the Horde!) Gamers and computer programmers also need chiropractic work.

Tour Image

This clip just blends some of my favorite things. There is a great company called video games live. I found out about them too late to see them when they came to Salt Lake City. I hope they come back I’d love to see this live. In the mean time enjoy the clip.

OK, I’m not getting the video to work, so here’s the link.

I’m sure you can also find plenty more at You Tube.